My half marathon training plan

If you’ve not run a half marathon before, there are dozens, if not hundreds, of training plans available. Some cost money to download and others are free for the taking online.

I’ve spent the better part of the last ten years evaluating race training plans, and found what works for some runners, does not work for others. One size does not fit all.

Some training plans have you running five or six times a week and others just twice. If I run four or five times a week, week after week, I’ll injure myself.

It’s best to test as many different types of training plans as you can to find what works for you. If possible, get a running coach, and see what she can build specifically for you.

Below is my half marathon training plan for the Joshua Tree race in November.

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Mileage

Week 0

3

3

Week 1

Hike

Rest

Abs

3

Rest

Rest

4

7

Week 2

Rest

Abs

3

Strength

Rest

Rest

3

6

Week 3

Rest

Strength

Rest

3

Rest

Rest

4

7

Week 4

Rest

Cross-train

4

Rest

Yoga

Rest

5

9

Week 5

Hike

Rest

Yoga

4.5

Rest

Rest

6.6

11.1

Week 6

Rest

3.5

Abs

Rest

3

Rest

5

11.5

Week 7

3.2

Rest

4

Rest

Yoga

Rest

6

13.2

Week 8

Rest

Abs

Rest

5

Rest

Rest

8

13

Week 9

2

Rest

Yoga

4

Rest

Rest

10K race

12.2

Week 10

3

Rest

Rest

3

Rest

Rest

10

16

Week 11

Rest

Rest

3

Rest

4

Rest

8

15

Week 12

Rest

4

Rest

Rest

Rest

Rest

Race Day

17.1

As of this entry, it’s week five of the plan. We did a killer hike this morning to work out any stiffness from my five-mile run yesterday. Everything is feeling pretty good.👌🏽

What’s important to look for in any training plan is how the weekly mileage increases. Slowly. It should be very slowly. Anything over 10-15% increase in mileage week over week is a red flag.

Even the popular Couch to 5K plan gives you the option of running for a set time as opposed to distance, which gives you a baseline to start with. Once you know, for example, how far you can go in twenty minutes, then you can slowly increase your mileage from there.

Don’t forget to add in strength and cross training. I also like to include yoga every other week to help with flexibility, breathing capacity, and mental focus.

When you train, do it on the same terrain as your race. If you’re running on trails, train on trails. Road race? Hit the pavement. Come race day, your body will thank you for the conditioning.

Two things that are equally as important, but not shown on the training plan are your nutrition (go plant-based) and sleep (get lots).

Last, don’t skip the dynamic warmup and comfortable cool down with rollout and stretching post-run. Stretching has become somewhat controversial on when you do it, how effective it is at helping reducing DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness), and impact on muscle health, but I’ve found it incredibly helpful.

The dynamic warmup helps get some heat to areas, like my hips, back and knees, that can’t get into gear as quickly as other parts like my quads and calf muscles.

Post-run stretching and foam and/or stick rolling are recovery tools that have become indispensable. If you’re short on time, and have to skip something, skip the dynamic warmup, but go out slowly. You’ll warm up naturally in the first few miles.

Stay healthy, friends. 🙏🏼🏃‍♀️💚



Leave a reply or comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.